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of a foreign service officer. learning about foreign-policy around the dinner table each night to this service in combat -- his service in combat in vietnam. less well known is the story of this foreign policy work inside dissonant. -- the senate. his 90 overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to
was unfolding. >> right. well, there is the actual foreign policy piece, then there's the partisan ranker. maggie, before this began, we were looking at hillary clinton's approval ratings. 67% favorable, 26% unfavorable, 6% no opinion. we don't know if she's running for office in 2016, right? but certainly, some of this criticism, some of this questioning, is perhaps directing at poking some holes in the clintonian armor, if you will. >> perhaps. i would go there. no, i think that's absolutely right. i think the issue about benghazi, when it initially began, was a way at getting at obama through hillary clinton, right, during the campaign, but it then evolved into something else that was about her for exactly that purpose. if the idea today was to ding her up memorably going into 2016, i don't think that was accomplished. rand paul did what he was supposed to do, it will make his base happy. it will not sway any votes. if i saw correctly, 37% of republicans approve of her. for her, that is not terrible. i mean, she has always been a pretty polarizing figure. she is leaving state departmen
on here, willie? >> they didn't break any new foreign policy ground, that was clear, in terms of the questioning. so then you're left to wonder what was going on there? what was the idea? although it was remarkable to see the two of them sitting together if you thought about where we were five years ago and them saying shame on you and you're likeable enough. >> you're a racist. >> andrea mitchell, am i being too cynical this morning? because these are two people i respect a great deal. >> a great deal. >> well, it was sort of -- as you're pointing out, it was really unusual to see them together. and to see the relationship that they have developed, i think that they have developed a close relationship. i was really intrigued by when he -- when steve kroft asked about what about the staffs, and they acknowledged it took longer for their staffs to get over the hurt and anger after the campaign, and i would say still hasn't happened, exactly. because she has been the most celebrated secretary of state and certainly the most high-profile member of the cabinet. and gets along very
about the september benghazi attacks and some of the foreign policy challenges facing the u.s., including iran, afghanistan, and syria. he also talked about the vietnam war after returning from vietnam over 40 years ago, he testified about his experience before this committee. john kerry is introduced by elizabeth warren, john mccain, and hillary clinton. a vote on his nomination by the full senate is expected next week. >> good morning. this hearing of the senate foreign relations committee will come to order. let me ask, as i did yesterday, i ask unanimous consent of returning members to allow prospective member to complete -- participate in today's hearing. if there is no objection, it is so ordered. let me start by saying, you are not at the table yet, senator. we will have you there shortly. wow. let me say, mr. chairman, you are still our committees chaired, deeply humbled to preside over the committee today as we consider your nomination. we are honored to welcome you as the president's nominee for a position you have most deservedly earned. the first time you testifi
not talk about the foreign policy, they did not even have a positive economic plan. they said it will be a referendum on an unsatisfactory referendum -- unsatisfactory performance of the incumbent. the stock market was stronger. it was just good enough to drag president obama across the finish line. i think there's plenty to look at. there are plenty of problems. project orca, the get-out-the- vote project. the message is much too limited, too smug, too assumed that people would reject liberal policies because we said they were liberal. the failure to provide a positive reforming conservative agenda. where was the romney health care plan, the positive plan, not just or peeling -- repealing obamacare? i do think scott walker, sam brownback, bob jindal, that is where you alcee conservative principles govern. in washington, a half to boast -- both oppose the obama administration, collaborate, and in the house, they have to figure out what it means to the beat -- to be the majority of one body of congress while the presidency and other house and congress is held by the other party
? the country's belligerent stance is one more issue on the president's full foreign policy plate, and it's going to be a concern for john kerry if he's confirmed secretary of state as he's very likely to be, increasingly likely, as a matter of fact. he got a very warm welcome from both sides of the hearing at his confirmation hearings in the senate today. >> the friendship has endured i believe it is based in myture respect. some observers have attributed that respect to the fact that when we were much younger nicer and better looking men than we are now senator kerry and i spent some time at the navy's behest in a certain southeast asian country in less pleasant circumstances than we're accustomed to in the united states senate. >> john is the right choice. and i urge his speedy confirmation. >> it's john john mccain so nice. much better reception than clinton herds got yesterday during the testimony of the bengahzi attacks. but it wasn't all warm and fuzzy. senator rob johnson who went after hillary clinton tried to get kerry to contradict hillary clinton's testimony. but he did not ta
's foreign policy aide related for diplomacy and our presence throughout the world. if you let back -- look back to congress 20, 25 years ago, is essentially made up of people who have the relationship to world war ii and its aftermath in terms of the u.s. global engagement. the marshall plan and the rebuilding of japan in america's prisons. in the relationship also in the lessons and threat posed by the cold war. and those were very defining, major umbrella issues that produced great statesman. henry jackson and others on a bipartisan bill and water's edge, america's presence and engagement around the world. two superpowers, the umbrella that was held over the world stifled the regional and local factions and tensions that erupted after the end of the cold war. that all had a significant impact on the american people and commitment and support for the u.s. to be at bobo -- be globally engaged. it is the possibility of a five alarm fire and everybody's been to try to keep them from getting out of control. with the fall of the wall in the aftermath, there was the defining event and that was
and the further of american foreign policy. all have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as a team of the world, but let me say, mr. chairman, it has been a pleasure working with you and looking forward to continuing to work with you on the issues you're a champion of the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of nuclear biological chemical weapons, fighting for human rights and against hiv aids to a round the world. fighting crime corruption, drug trafficking, and standing up, as you always have, for the interest of foreign service around the world. in your new role, should you be confirmed, and i know you will, your portfolio will be greatly expanded, center stage representing the interest of all this from securing our embassies in protecting our overseas personnel to promoting commerce and enhancing cross cultural ties and keeping american security corporation where possible and isolation where necessary as in
role in helping the president shape some of the big foreign policy decisions that have come out of this white house, including drawing down the troops in afghanistan, ending the war in iraq, responding to some of the national -- or natural, rather, disasters that have occurred during president obama's tenure, including japan, haiti, and you remember he was pictured in the situation room after the raid on osama bin laden, so this is someone with whom president obama has worked for quite some time. he has a good working relationship with white house staffers, and just a little bit of biographical information, alex. he lives with his wife and three kids in maryland. he is one of 11 kids himself. president obama coming out right now to announce this new appointment, chief of staff dennis mcdonough. >> thank you, kristen. >> thank you. thank you, everybody. please, everybody, have a seat. good afternoon, everybody, and welcome to the announcement of one of the worst kept secrets in washington. as president i rely on an extraordinary team of men and women here at the white house every
attack. joining us now, danielle pletka, vice president foreign policy and defense studies, defense policy studies, i should say, at the american enterprise institute. danielle, thanks for being with us. you wrote a column this week in which your first words were it's hard to like john kerry? [laughter] >> well, i worked for ten years up at the senate foreign relations committee when senator kerry wasn't the chairman, he was one of the other members of the committee. he's just not that popular on capitol hill. he hasn't worked well with other members. that was one of the problems he had when he ran for president. he's perceived as being stand offish, as being uninterested in their issues and in being kind of doctrinaire on policy. jon: but bob corker, the new mexico senator -- we're going to be talking to him next hour -- had glowing words for senator kerry in the hearing this morning. >> every senator walks into a hearing with another senator who's been nominated for something thinking there but for the grace of god go i. it's a collegial institution, but the collegiality is about
foreign policy and hopefully tomorrow in john kerrey's hearing before the senate foreign relations committee we'll get into that because the real issue is the date on obama foreign policies. >> thank you. phil mickelson, tiger woods, lebron jamgs and derek jeter, guess, what they're all supply siders. i'm going to try to explain that to you up next. (announcer) scottrade knows our clients trade and invest their own way. with scottrade's smart text, i can quickly understand my charts, and spend more time trading. their quick trade bar lets my account follow me online so i can react in real-time. plus, my local scottrade office is there to help. because they know i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. i'm with scottrade. (announcer) scottrade. voted "best investment services company." ♪ i don't wanna be right [ record scratch ] what?! it's not bad for you. it just tastes that way. [ female announcer ] honey nut cheerios cereal -- heart-healthy, whole grain oats. you can't go wrong loving it. excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i thi
white house. he has helped advise president obama on some of his key foreign policy decisions, including drawing down the troops in afghanistan, ending the war in iraq, and also responding to some of the natural disasters that have occurred in recent years, including haiti, and japan. he is someone who has built up a lot of trust here in the white house. you heard that today when president obama talked about him, talked about how much he meant to the staffers here. we should also mention he was pictured in the situation room during the raid on osama bin laden, so this is certainly someone who is very close to the president and will be a key figure moving forward with this white house. andrea. >> thank you so much, kristen welker. david gregory here and pete williams joining us as well. autowe've seen good chiefs of staff and bad. some of the best. jim bakker, ken duberstein, leon panetta in times of trouble. >> howard baker certainly rescuing the ronald reagan second term from don regan, a bad chief of staff by all accounts. what is the pluses and minuses of denis mcdonough. he knows the
immediate. that is why we need political leaders who will make the case. on the campaign, foreign policy is different than domestic policy. you might have seen this people don't ask what do you think we should do abouts? what do you think about the second amendment? they ask you're going protect my second amendment rights, aren't you? they ask that about libya and afghanistan. we experience the economy or the domestic policy first-hand in our churches, in our workplace. very few people including the people here in washington experience the world first-hand. there is more opportunity for leadership and persuasion in foreign policy than in domestic policy. unfortunately, our prosecutor does not try to make that case. >> on the subject of guns, i take it you're not a gun controller. do you regard any of president obama's proposals as reasonable? something that one should swallow? >> i think his proposals will be ineffective. i think they are provepbt to be ineffective of the assault weapons ban. there is no impact on crime in general or mass murderer in particular. there was an assault weap
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
the speech, however, briep, was the absence of foreign policy. and the two really contentious appointments, or at least one is chuck hagel who is going to run the defense department. and the middle east is aflame again and now we're seeing it spread into africa in a way that is very hard to get a fix for what the model is dealing with it. these are failed states. we have tribalism again prevailing in africa and again in the middle east because islamic rage has not been distinguished. command and control of al qaeda they believe has been broken down, but as you saw in algeria in the past several days, this is going to be a continuing problem out there. that will go to the defense department, how it's run, how much money they have to spend, how they reorganized the response of that and secretary kerry would is going to pick up the baton from hillary clinton has to decide what's our relationship with egypt? how run by a muslim brotherhood. >> it's worth remarking on that because four years ago, as we all sat here, none of us expected every assumption you would make about the middle east for d
. winnie stachelberg will join us. and president obama posing foreign-policy -- president obama's foreign-policy with max boot. and workplace speech laws were guarding social media. is the guest.ear >> finance started in the 1930s. it is really a spinoff as a self help. the 1930s is known for everything from the hard economic times to the 1930s, easy everything from alcoholics anonymous to getting rich to various social activists movements. fascism and communism start to be a big deal. porter develops personal finance. her goal is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. it is very much of its time, an idea that we can teach people certain skills and if they learn these skills, we will all be ok. >> the dark side of the financial industry with helaine olen. like us on facebook. c-span, created by american cable companies in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your tv provider. >> secretary of state hillary clinton was questioned about the september 11 attacks about that u.s. diplomatic post in benghazi, libya. a u.s. ambassador died in that attack and three
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
as a devout man involved in every major foreign policy decision of this administration. >>> following breaking news. an appeals court ruling of his appointments unconstitutional. i'll speak with pete williams about what it means for the president and the white house. >>> plus, georgia republican senator chambliss announced his re retirement and republicans say it's one of the best pickup opportunities for the cycle. and you can always join our conversation on twitter. we've all had those moments. when you lost the thing you can't believe you lost. when what you just bought, just broke. or when you have a little trouble a long way from home... as an american express cardmember you can expect some help. but what you might not expect, is you can get all this with a prepaid card. spends like cash. feels like membership. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. she was
donough. he's seen as a top foreign policy adviser to the president. he would be obama's fifth chief of staff. >>> all right. feeling a little drowsy this morning? you're in good company. new research from harvard medical school finds about one-third of all workers just aren't getting enough sleep to work at peak efficiency. and that's costing u.s. companies more than $63 billion a year in lost productivity. richard lui is here with a drill down on third pun of the day, an eye-opening report. >> it is. and this is a sign of the times. >> i'm sorry. it's friday. >> not the puns but this. sleep pods are not a common sight at most businesses. with the cost of sleepy workers rising, the metro nap energy pod is becoming more popular. and devices like that. google has $13,000 lounges like that on its campus. now others are investing in sleep programs according to "the wall street journal." shuteye shortage has hit our capital, too. vice president biden had a 30-second blink during an obama speech while tim geithner fought the long blink with rapid fire right next to him. secretary of state hillary
him look bad on foreign policy, he's going to hold out as long as he can and say, look, everybody behave themselves and play nice with me and at the end maybe i'll let you have the big list. >> megyn: and he'll try to withstand the pressure to make an endorsement as long as possible. i don't know, i think it's tougher when one of the people is the man you selected as your vice-president. yes, she's secretary of state, but vice-president, air telling the world, he could be president. i'm telling you, feel comfortable with the thought of him being president, god forbid anything happens to me and tougher to turn around and say, actually i liked her better. (laughter) >> he'll have to hope that joe biden will hold off longer. >> megyn: we'll find out. thanks, chris. >> you bet. >> megyn: we're learning more today about a new pentagon plan that lifts the ban on women in combat. wow, this turned out to be controversial. getting a lot of strong reaction to this and up next, we'll have some new concerns with the debate. and arrest and murder from the city of brotherly love, the frighteni
with president george w. bush and foreign policy will be happening in the second term. >> the first thing that strikes me on a day like today is what a wonderful celebration this is with our democracy. the peaceful transfer of power. of course president obama is being affirmed again, but we look at our institutions. you see the supreme court justice swear in the president. it's a wonderful thing and it's something that when you've traveled around the world, not every country can take this moment for granted. when the will of the people is confirmed and affirmed the way we're going to see today. >> the president is speaking to the world, he's speaking to the united states, he's speaking to the people in washington and he's speaking to republicans. what does he need to say to republicans? >> on inaugural day, it is really the high point for any presidency, i think, because after that we start to get back to our regular criticism, and we did this wrong and that wrong, and so i would hope the president would use the opportunity to say i've won the election, but this
and cody keenan. ben rhodes usually takes the foreign policy side of things. jon favreau, he's usually most involved in this big vision. >> >> jennifer: he's like 31 years old. >> cody keenan also young. he always plays a hand in this. my guess would be -- i haven't spoken to favreau about this. he would be working on this closely with president obama. they do the speeches up until the last minute. on the nobel prize acceptance speech, obama came down from his hotel room with a copy of the speech, went to the fourth floor and gave changes to make on the way over to receive the speech. that could be going on right now. >> john: these guys write the speeches in terms of overview. they're there for structure and tone but it is the president himself who decides what the final content is going to be and who makes the revisions he needs to. how deep his editorial involvement is. >> jennifer: if you're going to be true to who you are, as president, you have to -- you have to have input on this. the language has to come from you, naturally. he's a good writer. obviously he's got significant opinion
was in many ways provided the intellectual framework particularly for a lot of bush foreign policy. vice president biden used the senate and the relationships there and his practical skills has been invaluable in terms of promoting the agenda. >> now we have the marine band about to introduce the vice president of the united states. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, the vice president of the united states, joseph r. biden, accompanied by inaugural coordinator for the joint congressional committee on ceremonies, kelly fado. senate department sergeant at arms, martina bradford. house saght at arms carry handley. harry reed and nancy pelosi. >> i said that was the marine band. it was the u.s. army herald trumpets. >> have to get that right. >> what were you saying mark? joe, joe, joe? >> i think this concerns what we were talking about. >> our first glimpse of the president as he walks through the hall, accompanied as you can see behind by chuck schumer head of the joint committee and next to him, lamar alexander of the bipartisanship on display and behind him the leadership of the house
of foreign policy, andy. good to have you here. good to see you. on the subject of foreign policy the president said the following in part: we are heirs to those who want peace and not just the war who turn sworn enemies into the surest of friends-- >> i've lost the audio. >> megyn: unfortunately we've lost the audio, you can hear anddy say. we'll try to get those reestablished and these are the dangers of live tv and these are the official vases. >> inaugural gifts. >> megyn: the one that was presented to the vice-president joe biden has a more springtime etching on the side of it and we'll take a brief listen and eric cantor and the president and first lady standing up. [applause] [applause] >> the toasts are coming up right after this. and this is in by the way, statuary hall. this used to be long, long ago, the hold house chamber, now it is the area in front of where the house of representatives is. there's a statue of nearly every state in statuary hall and the halls around that area, as we see the president and vice-president receiving those gifts. >> megyn: it wasn't the b
. in that it was almost entirely about foreign policy. we would go anywhere, bear any price, pay any price, bear any burden to ensure the survival of liberty. this time, the president's foreign policy really was disspilled into seven words, a decade of war is now ending, the contrast of the last half century is striking. >> and jonathan karl who covers the white house for us, jon, i know you're in the capitol steps, the president saying we can't succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone yet the bulk of the speech really praised and support and encouragement for all the things we do together through our government. >> george, i felt during much of that speech like i was listening to a democratic ronald reagan where reagan was unapologetically conservative. this was unapologetically progressive saying we must act collectively. and this was also bound with optimism saying america's possibilities are limitless. this was an effort, i believe, at that kind of optimistic progressivism whereas a reagan was your optimistic conservatism. also, i was very struck by on
in foreign policy. it's inevitable we're going find plays we funded people who are actually against this. as you know, i prefer less foreign involvement. >> another question from the web. the president talked about climate change. it's not something that we've heard a lot about in the debates that you've been discussing over the past hour or so. your thoughts on where it might go in the 113th congress? >> my instinct what you heard in the president's inauguration speech, he was trying to basically throw a bone to every left-wing activist group he could and so start to think about this more from this white house. they received so much pressure from labor and those who want the economy to grow like the keystone pipeline. and companies that want like solyndra. you start to see the gains being played. and this goes back to my earlier discussion. if you actually just read the speech and wrote side notes and says it's for this constituency and make this group money, if i do a keystone pipeline vote over here and allow it to go. i better throw some red meat to the environmentalist activists. i'
is the right force to carry forward the obama administration foreign policy, and i urge his speedy confirmation. >> i love john kerry. >> stephanie: mary in atlanta, you are on the "stephanie miller show." hi, mary. >> caller: hi, how are you doing miss stephanie. that was me i am so sorry. >> stephanie: that's all right. >> caller: i'm calling because i wanted to just make a point about -- you know perhaps we shouldn't be so quick to judge. we should be a little slower to judge with bernie sanders -- >> stephanie: do you mean harry reid or bernie sanders. >> caller: i'm sorry harry reid. i'm sorry. because he is seasoned. he knows what he is doing, and he looks at the big picture and he looks at it in the long run, and with all of these republican controlled houses in various states that, you know, would normally vote for a democratic president, if they get a chance to gerrymander and get control, then those votes no matter what the popular vote is it goes towards the republicans. >> stephanie: yeah we'll talk about what they are up to with that as we continue f
that is extremely well. that line. it '02 not only a foreign policy figure but a politician. what is the effective counter to that? one, i think we have to acknowledge we have a lot of nation building to do here at home. and that needs to be the priority. and that reality i think is going effect the kind of resources we are going have available to do the kind of global engagement global diplomacy that we have seen in the past. and i think we're going -- we are severely resource constrainted and politically constrained and we have to prioritize and make the case for whatever expenditure go out relative to military presence and spending more state and diplomacy in foreign aid spending. so that is the reality that we have to deal with, we have to, i believe, we will be forced to have to make hard choices. in that regard. secondly, i would simply say as i say to virtually every interest group that comes in to my office saying you know -- here is the line. we know that resources are tight, we know we have to give it back, but our program is different than everybody else's. and that's universal. and rat
on two less obvious facets of foreign policy, the earnvinement and his economy and talked about the u.s. putting its own fiscal house in order to be a leader on the world stage. kerry, a long-time clean energy advocate says it is a $6 trillion market worth millions of american jobs and we need to get in the game. >> the solution of climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues. >> he was less committal about whether he would approve the keystone pipeline because it would cross the border between the u.s. and canada. kerry is expected to get a positive recommendation from the committee and if you will confirmation from the full senate next week. back with more bill press after the break. stay with us. alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with so
of foreign policy for the coming year. conor, thank you so much. we'll see you soon. bill: there are thousands heading to the national mall in washington. it is called the largest human rights demonstration in the world. we are live to tell you what that's all about in just minutes. martha: and missing, now, in iran, they do not know where this american pastor who is being held in iran is. his family now can't find hill. they visit him every week and now he is gone. big questions. we will speak to his wife after this. twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. that's a good thing, but
administration. second term. >> foreign policy is your expertise. three weeks ago we would not have thought of africa being a threat to americans. what concerns you about that situation? what can the president do about going forward? >> i think if we're talking about mali and places around mali, the president should support those who are going to lead the french. the french have a unique relationship and interest in mali. i think we should support them to the extent we can. they're one of our nato allies and they have been a friend of ours. but we have to keep our eye on the places. i don't think it will require american soldiers on the ground, but we have to realize that al qaeda has been badly diminished. let's not overlook the success we have had. but it doesn't mean it's gone away. and it doesn't mean that every al qaeda cell is getting ready to attack the united states of america. they're doing other things in the region as well. so be vigilant. help our friends. i don't think there's a need for a commitment of american troops. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for being with us. as
fiscal cliff discussion, the economy is going to get zooming, we're going to -- foreign policy. >> it could end up being in foreign policy, drawing down troops, transitioning to this new kind of fighting force with the drone warfare, sort of in keeping with what we're alluding to eisenhower had. >> i think we're going to watch too very different but equally fascinating dramas play out. inside washington, the republicans still have the votes to stop the president on many things. they still control the house. they still have operational gridlock in the senate, if you will, even though democrats picked up. inside washington, the president has a challenge. but if you look at this, groundbreaking on gaye rights, back to climate change, gun control, immigration. and who that appeals to, as jack just said. they have made a doubling down of what they did in the campaign. they believe they have the coalition of the future -- young people, latinos, african-americans, and they believe the republican coalition is aging, in decline, and fractured. so they think politically they have the jui
and nuclear test. let's bring in our expert now of foreign defense policy at the american enterprise institute. michael, let's just go here. so is kim jong-un, if he is trying to prove that he is not afraid of the big bad wolf, that being the u.s. or is this another attention grabber? what is it that he wants from the united states? take any money, because it's not going to get it. >> yesterday shown that he is not afraid by launching his missile in december. and also china before that back in april. i'm not so sure why north korea is upset about this. it's empty and it doesn't do anything but previous extender thing. there is no reason to do so. they are not doing anything about the north korean provocations. >> this guy has to raise his own head and try to get some attentions. let's talk about the people that might be watching. japan is right there and we are talking about proximity. we are talking about how much attention they can get. they are hoping for a response. then there is china who is north korea's major ally in terms of diplomacy. but china is now saying that kim jong-un is backin
off a foreign policy team to shape that as well that looks different. >> it does look different than the first term. it is about returning america home and defining what engagement looks like in a second term. he just got tax increases and he wants more revenue. if he can find a way to say i will cut sending in a big way and has the ability of splitting that republican coalition and he seems to be interested in doing. >> he was very close in the senate to the senator from oklahoma. if you spend 15 minutes with him as i did recently, he has ways to reduce spending on medicare that also improves service. the system is a mess. i think if i'm barack obama which obviously i'm not, but pafr ever we are in a bar and he's about to get inaugurated. >> would invite him to dinner about how to make medicare better and cheaper. >> here told us and tells a lot of people that's not who i am. i get a feeling the president is ready to get out of his comfort zone and reach out to democrats and republicans. >> there is this idea that the second term we have about a year and a half o
is the sole witness today at back-to-back hearings before the senate and house foreign policy committee. here live coverage of the senate hearing at 9:00 a.m. eastern and a house hearing at 2:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span radio or watched the hearings on c-span 3. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> what is the best training for a policeman? >> i said it before and i will say it again -- the best training you can get to become a really good police officer and understand what it's all about is walk but -- you learn how to develop sources, you learn how to use intelligence information. you learn how to leverage relationships. that is the key. people in a community trust you, they will tell you when the things that are happening that are not yet -- so you can intervene. they tell you all about how to go about doing it. i really learned the most in my career from those relationships. >> from high school dropout and single mother to the youngest police chief in washington, d.c., history. what cathy lanier on c-span's q&a. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979
about the risk that men and women of the foreign service take for our country. >> for me this is not just a matter of policy. it's personal. i stood next to president obama as the marines carried those flag-draped caskets off the plane at andrews. i put my arms around the mothers and fathers the sisters and brothers, the sons and daughters, and the wives left alone to raise their children. >> john: but for some republicans the issue wasn't the sacrifice americans make overseas but performing a human sacrifice of what was left of susan rice's reputation. as you'll recall there were over 20 protests against americans in the middle east that day related to a video. her comments were based on talking points prepared and approved by u.s. intelligence officials. just don't tell that to senator john mccain. he may have to switch his anger button to off. >> the american people deserve to know answers and they certainly don't deserve false answers. the answers given to the american people on september 15th by the ambassador of the united nations were false. >> john: that's mccain
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